Directions

Ingredients

5 Communication Skills That Will Boost Your Partnership

Does it seem like you and your partner continue to have the same argument over and over again? Do you feel like your arguments are becoming pointless and it’s easier just to avoid issues and shut down? Do you feel like so much is left unsaid because saying what you really feel will just lead to more conflict?

According to expert relationship therapists and coaches, the danger for marriages is not so much in the conflict itself as it is in the slow drifting apart that comes from avoiding conflict. If we can learn some new skills that allow us to express ourselves—and listen—in a safe and caring way, then conflict can actually become a path to understanding and deepening connection.

Today, we’re gonna take a look at five powerful, expert-backed communication skills that will help your relationships grow, deepen, and thrive.

1. Make two commitments: the first to connection, the second to honesty

Before saying a word, check in with yourself internally: are you committed to sustaining and deepening your relationship with your partner despite potential differences and conflicts?

If the answer is no, then it’s almost impossible to use the following communication skills to build the relationship. A commitment to connection comes first, all else follows. There is no magic trick for generating this commitment. It’s something that you choose, and something that only you can know if it resonates in your heart.

After committing to connection, the second commitment is to honestly reveal your desires, your values, and your fears. In most long-term relationships this can be dangerous because some of these desires, values, and fears have either remained unspoken for a long time or are a known source of conflict.

2. Slow down

Before sharing or responding, take deep breaths and slow down. Remember to do this before, during, and after interacting with your partner.

Slowing down allows you to tune in to your own feelings as well as recognize what your partner is feeling. From this pause in the action, new possibilities emerge.

3. Touch base on your commitments

Set aside time with your partner to talk about your two commitments (to connection and honesty) and ask them how they feel hearing this. The two commitments are really commitments for relating in a new way with one another.

You’re saying: I want to reveal my authentic, true self to you, but I also want to do it in a way that supports our relationship, our love, and our mutual understanding. Go into this talk with no agenda but to express your commitments and openly listen to how they feel hearing them.

4. Reflect what you heard your partner say

Anytime things get a little heated or tense, take a pause and sincerely reflect back to your partner what you heard them saying. Use “I statements” and focus the reflections on what you experienced.

Be sure you don’t do it word-for-word. Rather, in your own words, honestly relay to them what you hear them saying. And then allow for them to clarify. Rinse and repeat until your partner feels understood.

5. Own your experience

In most relationship conflicts, our knee-jerk reaction is to make the other person 100% responsible for our feelings. We think that we feel emotionally hurt, insulted, or neglected because the other person said the hurtful thing, did the insulting thing, or neglected to do the caring thing.

And while the other person may bear some (or even a lot of) responsibility, our feelings are usually triggered by our own unique (often childhood) histories of being hurt, insulted, or neglected.

Own your experience by speaking in undeniable truths: when you experienced X, you felt Y. You are not saying the other person caused your experience; you are not saying the other person caused your feelings and you are not assigning blame on the other person. Instead, you are owning your experience and owning your feelings.


If this article resonate with you, be sure to check out our
Connect 101 Workshop and our weekly Connect live event: Parent Connection Tuesday and our monthly couples event: Just the Two of Us: A Date Night of Authentic Connection for Life Partners. RSVP here.

5 Communication Skills That Will Boost Your Partnership

Close
Theme icon

Podcast /

Content /

Connect

5 Communication Skills That Will Boost Your Partnership

Let's look at five expert communication skills that will transform the way you and your partner relate to each other

Join The Family Thrive community and download the mobile app, all for free!

JOIN TODAY

Key takeaways

1

The danger for marriages is drifting apart from avoiding conflict, not the conflict itself

2

Commit to connection and honesty, and take deep breaths to slow down

3

Touch base on your commitments to connection and honesty, reflect what you heard your partner say, and own your experiences

Low hassle, high nutrition

Fierce Food: Easy

Fierce Food: Easy

50/50 mixes of powerful veggies and starchy favorites

Fierce Food: Balance

Fierce Food: Balance

Maximize nutrients, minimize sugar and starch

Fierce Food: Power

Fierce Food: Power

Ingredients

Kitchen Equipment

Ingredient Replacement

View replacement list (PDF)

Reading time:

3 Minutes

Does it seem like you and your partner continue to have the same argument over and over again? Do you feel like your arguments are becoming pointless and it’s easier just to avoid issues and shut down? Do you feel like so much is left unsaid because saying what you really feel will just lead to more conflict?

According to expert relationship therapists and coaches, the danger for marriages is not so much in the conflict itself as it is in the slow drifting apart that comes from avoiding conflict. If we can learn some new skills that allow us to express ourselves—and listen—in a safe and caring way, then conflict can actually become a path to understanding and deepening connection.

Today, we’re gonna take a look at five powerful, expert-backed communication skills that will help your relationships grow, deepen, and thrive.

1. Make two commitments: the first to connection, the second to honesty

Before saying a word, check in with yourself internally: are you committed to sustaining and deepening your relationship with your partner despite potential differences and conflicts?

If the answer is no, then it’s almost impossible to use the following communication skills to build the relationship. A commitment to connection comes first, all else follows. There is no magic trick for generating this commitment. It’s something that you choose, and something that only you can know if it resonates in your heart.

After committing to connection, the second commitment is to honestly reveal your desires, your values, and your fears. In most long-term relationships this can be dangerous because some of these desires, values, and fears have either remained unspoken for a long time or are a known source of conflict.

2. Slow down

Before sharing or responding, take deep breaths and slow down. Remember to do this before, during, and after interacting with your partner.

Slowing down allows you to tune in to your own feelings as well as recognize what your partner is feeling. From this pause in the action, new possibilities emerge.

3. Touch base on your commitments

Set aside time with your partner to talk about your two commitments (to connection and honesty) and ask them how they feel hearing this. The two commitments are really commitments for relating in a new way with one another.

You’re saying: I want to reveal my authentic, true self to you, but I also want to do it in a way that supports our relationship, our love, and our mutual understanding. Go into this talk with no agenda but to express your commitments and openly listen to how they feel hearing them.

4. Reflect what you heard your partner say

Anytime things get a little heated or tense, take a pause and sincerely reflect back to your partner what you heard them saying. Use “I statements” and focus the reflections on what you experienced.

Be sure you don’t do it word-for-word. Rather, in your own words, honestly relay to them what you hear them saying. And then allow for them to clarify. Rinse and repeat until your partner feels understood.

5. Own your experience

In most relationship conflicts, our knee-jerk reaction is to make the other person 100% responsible for our feelings. We think that we feel emotionally hurt, insulted, or neglected because the other person said the hurtful thing, did the insulting thing, or neglected to do the caring thing.

And while the other person may bear some (or even a lot of) responsibility, our feelings are usually triggered by our own unique (often childhood) histories of being hurt, insulted, or neglected.

Own your experience by speaking in undeniable truths: when you experienced X, you felt Y. You are not saying the other person caused your experience; you are not saying the other person caused your feelings and you are not assigning blame on the other person. Instead, you are owning your experience and owning your feelings.


If this article resonate with you, be sure to check out our
Connect 101 Workshop and our weekly Connect live event: Parent Connection Tuesday and our monthly couples event: Just the Two of Us: A Date Night of Authentic Connection for Life Partners. RSVP here.

Does it seem like you and your partner continue to have the same argument over and over again? Do you feel like your arguments are becoming pointless and it’s easier just to avoid issues and shut down? Do you feel like so much is left unsaid because saying what you really feel will just lead to more conflict?

According to expert relationship therapists and coaches, the danger for marriages is not so much in the conflict itself as it is in the slow drifting apart that comes from avoiding conflict. If we can learn some new skills that allow us to express ourselves—and listen—in a safe and caring way, then conflict can actually become a path to understanding and deepening connection.

Today, we’re gonna take a look at five powerful, expert-backed communication skills that will help your relationships grow, deepen, and thrive.

1. Make two commitments: the first to connection, the second to honesty

Before saying a word, check in with yourself internally: are you committed to sustaining and deepening your relationship with your partner despite potential differences and conflicts?

If the answer is no, then it’s almost impossible to use the following communication skills to build the relationship. A commitment to connection comes first, all else follows. There is no magic trick for generating this commitment. It’s something that you choose, and something that only you can know if it resonates in your heart.

After committing to connection, the second commitment is to honestly reveal your desires, your values, and your fears. In most long-term relationships this can be dangerous because some of these desires, values, and fears have either remained unspoken for a long time or are a known source of conflict.

2. Slow down

Before sharing or responding, take deep breaths and slow down. Remember to do this before, during, and after interacting with your partner.

Slowing down allows you to tune in to your own feelings as well as recognize what your partner is feeling. From this pause in the action, new possibilities emerge.

3. Touch base on your commitments

Set aside time with your partner to talk about your two commitments (to connection and honesty) and ask them how they feel hearing this. The two commitments are really commitments for relating in a new way with one another.

You’re saying: I want to reveal my authentic, true self to you, but I also want to do it in a way that supports our relationship, our love, and our mutual understanding. Go into this talk with no agenda but to express your commitments and openly listen to how they feel hearing them.

4. Reflect what you heard your partner say

Anytime things get a little heated or tense, take a pause and sincerely reflect back to your partner what you heard them saying. Use “I statements” and focus the reflections on what you experienced.

Be sure you don’t do it word-for-word. Rather, in your own words, honestly relay to them what you hear them saying. And then allow for them to clarify. Rinse and repeat until your partner feels understood.

5. Own your experience

In most relationship conflicts, our knee-jerk reaction is to make the other person 100% responsible for our feelings. We think that we feel emotionally hurt, insulted, or neglected because the other person said the hurtful thing, did the insulting thing, or neglected to do the caring thing.

And while the other person may bear some (or even a lot of) responsibility, our feelings are usually triggered by our own unique (often childhood) histories of being hurt, insulted, or neglected.

Own your experience by speaking in undeniable truths: when you experienced X, you felt Y. You are not saying the other person caused your experience; you are not saying the other person caused your feelings and you are not assigning blame on the other person. Instead, you are owning your experience and owning your feelings.


If this article resonate with you, be sure to check out our
Connect 101 Workshop and our weekly Connect live event: Parent Connection Tuesday and our monthly couples event: Just the Two of Us: A Date Night of Authentic Connection for Life Partners. RSVP here.

Does it seem like you and your partner continue to have the same argument over and over again? Do you feel like your arguments are becoming pointless and it’s easier just to avoid issues and shut down? Do you feel like so much is left unsaid because saying what you really feel will just lead to more conflict?

According to expert relationship therapists and coaches, the danger for marriages is not so much in the conflict itself as it is in the slow drifting apart that comes from avoiding conflict. If we can learn some new skills that allow us to express ourselves—and listen—in a safe and caring way, then conflict can actually become a path to understanding and deepening connection.

Today, we’re gonna take a look at five powerful, expert-backed communication skills that will help your relationships grow, deepen, and thrive.

1. Make two commitments: the first to connection, the second to honesty

Before saying a word, check in with yourself internally: are you committed to sustaining and deepening your relationship with your partner despite potential differences and conflicts?

If the answer is no, then it’s almost impossible to use the following communication skills to build the relationship. A commitment to connection comes first, all else follows. There is no magic trick for generating this commitment. It’s something that you choose, and something that only you can know if it resonates in your heart.

After committing to connection, the second commitment is to honestly reveal your desires, your values, and your fears. In most long-term relationships this can be dangerous because some of these desires, values, and fears have either remained unspoken for a long time or are a known source of conflict.

2. Slow down

Before sharing or responding, take deep breaths and slow down. Remember to do this before, during, and after interacting with your partner.

Slowing down allows you to tune in to your own feelings as well as recognize what your partner is feeling. From this pause in the action, new possibilities emerge.

3. Touch base on your commitments

Set aside time with your partner to talk about your two commitments (to connection and honesty) and ask them how they feel hearing this. The two commitments are really commitments for relating in a new way with one another.

You’re saying: I want to reveal my authentic, true self to you, but I also want to do it in a way that supports our relationship, our love, and our mutual understanding. Go into this talk with no agenda but to express your commitments and openly listen to how they feel hearing them.

4. Reflect what you heard your partner say

Anytime things get a little heated or tense, take a pause and sincerely reflect back to your partner what you heard them saying. Use “I statements” and focus the reflections on what you experienced.

Be sure you don’t do it word-for-word. Rather, in your own words, honestly relay to them what you hear them saying. And then allow for them to clarify. Rinse and repeat until your partner feels understood.

5. Own your experience

In most relationship conflicts, our knee-jerk reaction is to make the other person 100% responsible for our feelings. We think that we feel emotionally hurt, insulted, or neglected because the other person said the hurtful thing, did the insulting thing, or neglected to do the caring thing.

And while the other person may bear some (or even a lot of) responsibility, our feelings are usually triggered by our own unique (often childhood) histories of being hurt, insulted, or neglected.

Own your experience by speaking in undeniable truths: when you experienced X, you felt Y. You are not saying the other person caused your experience; you are not saying the other person caused your feelings and you are not assigning blame on the other person. Instead, you are owning your experience and owning your feelings.


If this article resonate with you, be sure to check out our
Connect 101 Workshop and our weekly Connect live event: Parent Connection Tuesday and our monthly couples event: Just the Two of Us: A Date Night of Authentic Connection for Life Partners. RSVP here.

Enjoying this? Subscribe to The Family Thrive for more healthy recipes, video classes, and more.

Discover Nourish

See more
5 Communication Skills That Will Boost Your Partnership

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

5 Communication Skills That Will Boost Your Partnership

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

Podcast

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

By

Alexandra Tataryn

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

Podcast

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

Podcast

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

Podcast

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

Podcast

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

Podcast

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

Pro Perspective

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

By

Alexandra Tataryn

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

New Research Tuesday

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

New Research Tuesday

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

New Research Tuesday

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

Recipes

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

Recipes

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

Recipes

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

Recipes

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

Give This a Try

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Subscribe to get all the goods

Join for free
Login