Directions

Ingredients

Meet The Family Thrive Experts: Alexia Hall, RDN

Alexia Hall is a Registered Dietitian (RDN) and Integrative and Functional Credentialed Practitioner (IFNCP, May 2021) with an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Certification in Food Allergy Management.

Alexia works with families to make healthful dietary changes as well as observe certain behaviors in children (such as picky eating) to see if these behaviors are signs of more serious disorders or health concerns.

What does "family" mean to you?

Everything. My family unit includes my biological family, my co-workers, friends, and patients. It means that this is my community and we are here to support each other and build each other up.

What does "thriving" mean to you?

That feeling of joy that comes from using your skills, passion, grit, and gifts to bring peace, healing, and joy to another human. When the people around you thrive, so do you.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

An artist. But as nutrition became more of my lifelong passion, I found that I was still able to use art to show off good healthy food!

When did you know you wanted to be a healer? Can you tell us about that time in your life, and what it felt like to come to that realization?

When my second daughter was born with some health issues. That magical moment when I realized that good food and nutrition helped to bring about her healing and the realization that I could use what I learned to help heal others!

When did you know you wanted to work with children?

I loved being an art docent in my children's elementary schools. Children are generally so excited and open to learning, especially if it involves fun and more than one of their senses. I love watching kids pick vegetables at a farm and tasting them for the first time!

What's the biggest difference between working with children and working with adults?

Children have that sense of wonder, hope, and fun and the attitude that they can do anything. We tend to lose some of that when we get older.

In your practice, what do you see as the biggest factors in children growing up loving nutritious foods?

Parents and their feelings about food, especially how open they are to trying new things. Especially in the toddler years. I honestly did not have the best nutrition practices when my kids were very young.

I've worked hard ever since to correct some of that in my own family and then teach that to others as well. It is so much easier to do when a child is two or three vs. when they are a teenager—let me tell you from experience!

As a mom and as a dietitian, what is one piece of parenting advice you'd give to The Family Thrive Parents?

Always have a positive expectation for your child. Kids live up to both positive and negative expectations. I find that if you label a kid one way (for example, picky), then they live up to it and it is tough to change later.

What is one piece of self-care advice you'd give to The Family Thrive Parents?

It doesn't have to be perfect and it doesn't have to be all or nothing. We are all on a journey and just being willing to try is a huge first step toward success.

What is your own most important self-care practice? Can you tell us a little bit about how you came to it, what it looks like, and how it helps you?

Sleep! Closely followed by exercise and water. I am a major grump without them!

What lies ahead for Alexia Hall?

The IFNCP credential and the training I am receiving will further my practice in the Integrative and Functional realm. I hope to use the platform that the Family Thrive is providing to spread the message of good nutrition. I also plan to advocate for healthier food and nutrition policies, especially in our National Free Lunch Program.

Thank You

Alexia Hall, RDN
Kitchen Curative

Meet The Family Thrive Experts: Alexia Hall, RDN

Close
Theme icon

Podcast /

Content /

Nourish

Meet The Family Thrive Experts: Alexia Hall, RDN

Take a moment to learn more about The Family Thrive team member Alexia Hall, RDN!

Join The Family Thrive community and download the mobile app, all for free!

JOIN TODAY

Key takeaways

1

2

3

Low hassle, high nutrition

Fierce Food: Easy

Fierce Food: Easy

50/50 mixes of powerful veggies and starchy favorites

Fierce Food: Balance

Fierce Food: Balance

Maximize nutrients, minimize sugar and starch

Fierce Food: Power

Fierce Food: Power

Ingredients

Kitchen Equipment

Ingredient Replacement

View replacement list (PDF)

Reading time:

5 Minutes

Alexia Hall is a Registered Dietitian (RDN) and Integrative and Functional Credentialed Practitioner (IFNCP, May 2021) with an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Certification in Food Allergy Management.

Alexia works with families to make healthful dietary changes as well as observe certain behaviors in children (such as picky eating) to see if these behaviors are signs of more serious disorders or health concerns.

What does "family" mean to you?

Everything. My family unit includes my biological family, my co-workers, friends, and patients. It means that this is my community and we are here to support each other and build each other up.

What does "thriving" mean to you?

That feeling of joy that comes from using your skills, passion, grit, and gifts to bring peace, healing, and joy to another human. When the people around you thrive, so do you.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

An artist. But as nutrition became more of my lifelong passion, I found that I was still able to use art to show off good healthy food!

When did you know you wanted to be a healer? Can you tell us about that time in your life, and what it felt like to come to that realization?

When my second daughter was born with some health issues. That magical moment when I realized that good food and nutrition helped to bring about her healing and the realization that I could use what I learned to help heal others!

When did you know you wanted to work with children?

I loved being an art docent in my children's elementary schools. Children are generally so excited and open to learning, especially if it involves fun and more than one of their senses. I love watching kids pick vegetables at a farm and tasting them for the first time!

What's the biggest difference between working with children and working with adults?

Children have that sense of wonder, hope, and fun and the attitude that they can do anything. We tend to lose some of that when we get older.

In your practice, what do you see as the biggest factors in children growing up loving nutritious foods?

Parents and their feelings about food, especially how open they are to trying new things. Especially in the toddler years. I honestly did not have the best nutrition practices when my kids were very young.

I've worked hard ever since to correct some of that in my own family and then teach that to others as well. It is so much easier to do when a child is two or three vs. when they are a teenager—let me tell you from experience!

As a mom and as a dietitian, what is one piece of parenting advice you'd give to The Family Thrive Parents?

Always have a positive expectation for your child. Kids live up to both positive and negative expectations. I find that if you label a kid one way (for example, picky), then they live up to it and it is tough to change later.

What is one piece of self-care advice you'd give to The Family Thrive Parents?

It doesn't have to be perfect and it doesn't have to be all or nothing. We are all on a journey and just being willing to try is a huge first step toward success.

What is your own most important self-care practice? Can you tell us a little bit about how you came to it, what it looks like, and how it helps you?

Sleep! Closely followed by exercise and water. I am a major grump without them!

What lies ahead for Alexia Hall?

The IFNCP credential and the training I am receiving will further my practice in the Integrative and Functional realm. I hope to use the platform that the Family Thrive is providing to spread the message of good nutrition. I also plan to advocate for healthier food and nutrition policies, especially in our National Free Lunch Program.

Thank You

Alexia Hall, RDN
Kitchen Curative

Alexia Hall is a Registered Dietitian (RDN) and Integrative and Functional Credentialed Practitioner (IFNCP, May 2021) with an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Certification in Food Allergy Management.

Alexia works with families to make healthful dietary changes as well as observe certain behaviors in children (such as picky eating) to see if these behaviors are signs of more serious disorders or health concerns.

What does "family" mean to you?

Everything. My family unit includes my biological family, my co-workers, friends, and patients. It means that this is my community and we are here to support each other and build each other up.

What does "thriving" mean to you?

That feeling of joy that comes from using your skills, passion, grit, and gifts to bring peace, healing, and joy to another human. When the people around you thrive, so do you.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

An artist. But as nutrition became more of my lifelong passion, I found that I was still able to use art to show off good healthy food!

When did you know you wanted to be a healer? Can you tell us about that time in your life, and what it felt like to come to that realization?

When my second daughter was born with some health issues. That magical moment when I realized that good food and nutrition helped to bring about her healing and the realization that I could use what I learned to help heal others!

When did you know you wanted to work with children?

I loved being an art docent in my children's elementary schools. Children are generally so excited and open to learning, especially if it involves fun and more than one of their senses. I love watching kids pick vegetables at a farm and tasting them for the first time!

What's the biggest difference between working with children and working with adults?

Children have that sense of wonder, hope, and fun and the attitude that they can do anything. We tend to lose some of that when we get older.

In your practice, what do you see as the biggest factors in children growing up loving nutritious foods?

Parents and their feelings about food, especially how open they are to trying new things. Especially in the toddler years. I honestly did not have the best nutrition practices when my kids were very young.

I've worked hard ever since to correct some of that in my own family and then teach that to others as well. It is so much easier to do when a child is two or three vs. when they are a teenager—let me tell you from experience!

As a mom and as a dietitian, what is one piece of parenting advice you'd give to The Family Thrive Parents?

Always have a positive expectation for your child. Kids live up to both positive and negative expectations. I find that if you label a kid one way (for example, picky), then they live up to it and it is tough to change later.

What is one piece of self-care advice you'd give to The Family Thrive Parents?

It doesn't have to be perfect and it doesn't have to be all or nothing. We are all on a journey and just being willing to try is a huge first step toward success.

What is your own most important self-care practice? Can you tell us a little bit about how you came to it, what it looks like, and how it helps you?

Sleep! Closely followed by exercise and water. I am a major grump without them!

What lies ahead for Alexia Hall?

The IFNCP credential and the training I am receiving will further my practice in the Integrative and Functional realm. I hope to use the platform that the Family Thrive is providing to spread the message of good nutrition. I also plan to advocate for healthier food and nutrition policies, especially in our National Free Lunch Program.

Thank You

Alexia Hall, RDN
Kitchen Curative

Alexia Hall is a Registered Dietitian (RDN) and Integrative and Functional Credentialed Practitioner (IFNCP, May 2021) with an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Certification in Food Allergy Management.

Alexia works with families to make healthful dietary changes as well as observe certain behaviors in children (such as picky eating) to see if these behaviors are signs of more serious disorders or health concerns.

What does "family" mean to you?

Everything. My family unit includes my biological family, my co-workers, friends, and patients. It means that this is my community and we are here to support each other and build each other up.

What does "thriving" mean to you?

That feeling of joy that comes from using your skills, passion, grit, and gifts to bring peace, healing, and joy to another human. When the people around you thrive, so do you.

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?

An artist. But as nutrition became more of my lifelong passion, I found that I was still able to use art to show off good healthy food!

When did you know you wanted to be a healer? Can you tell us about that time in your life, and what it felt like to come to that realization?

When my second daughter was born with some health issues. That magical moment when I realized that good food and nutrition helped to bring about her healing and the realization that I could use what I learned to help heal others!

When did you know you wanted to work with children?

I loved being an art docent in my children's elementary schools. Children are generally so excited and open to learning, especially if it involves fun and more than one of their senses. I love watching kids pick vegetables at a farm and tasting them for the first time!

What's the biggest difference between working with children and working with adults?

Children have that sense of wonder, hope, and fun and the attitude that they can do anything. We tend to lose some of that when we get older.

In your practice, what do you see as the biggest factors in children growing up loving nutritious foods?

Parents and their feelings about food, especially how open they are to trying new things. Especially in the toddler years. I honestly did not have the best nutrition practices when my kids were very young.

I've worked hard ever since to correct some of that in my own family and then teach that to others as well. It is so much easier to do when a child is two or three vs. when they are a teenager—let me tell you from experience!

As a mom and as a dietitian, what is one piece of parenting advice you'd give to The Family Thrive Parents?

Always have a positive expectation for your child. Kids live up to both positive and negative expectations. I find that if you label a kid one way (for example, picky), then they live up to it and it is tough to change later.

What is one piece of self-care advice you'd give to The Family Thrive Parents?

It doesn't have to be perfect and it doesn't have to be all or nothing. We are all on a journey and just being willing to try is a huge first step toward success.

What is your own most important self-care practice? Can you tell us a little bit about how you came to it, what it looks like, and how it helps you?

Sleep! Closely followed by exercise and water. I am a major grump without them!

What lies ahead for Alexia Hall?

The IFNCP credential and the training I am receiving will further my practice in the Integrative and Functional realm. I hope to use the platform that the Family Thrive is providing to spread the message of good nutrition. I also plan to advocate for healthier food and nutrition policies, especially in our National Free Lunch Program.

Thank You

Alexia Hall, RDN
Kitchen Curative

Enjoying this? Subscribe to The Family Thrive for more healthy recipes, video classes, and more.

Discover Nourish

See more
Meet The Family Thrive Experts: Alexia Hall, RDN

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

Meet The Family Thrive Experts: Alexia Hall, RDN

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

Podcast

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

By

Alexandra Tataryn

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

Podcast

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

Podcast

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

Podcast

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

Podcast

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

Podcast

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

Pro Perspective

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

By

Alexandra Tataryn

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

New Research Tuesday

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

New Research Tuesday

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

New Research Tuesday

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

Recipes

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

Recipes

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

Recipes

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

Recipes

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

Give This a Try

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Subscribe to get all the goods

Join for free
Login