Directions

Ingredients

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

What kind of study was this?

The article reports two studies the researchers did: an observational study was done at a single point in time (known as a cross-sectional study) and a randomized, placebo-controlled study where the researchers randomly assigned participants to two different groups, one given a placebo and the other given an active treatment. Then the researchers measured the differences between the two groups after a period of time.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know whether vitamin C levels and supplementation affect energy, mood, and cognitive functioning.

What did the researchers actually do?

In the first study, they took blood samples from participants and examined the link between vitamin C levels and mood. This is called a cross-sectional observational analysis and it can only tell us if two things are linked, not if one is causing the other (there could be a third unmeasured variable affecting both).

So, the researchers followed up with a randomized, placebo-controlled study that does a much better job at indicating whether one thing is causing another. In this second study, they randomly assigned participants to two groups: for four weeks, one group got a placebo pill twice a day and the other got a vitamin C pill twice a day (1000 mg per day).

At the beginning and end of the four weeks, the participants were given tests to measure energy levels, attention, and mood, among other things. At the end of the study, the researchers examined the differences in these measures between the groups.

What did the researchers find?

In the first study, they found a significant link between vitamin C levels in the blood and energy and mood. Then in the randomized, placebo-controlled study, they found that participants who were given vitamin C had significantly higher levels of energy, stronger attention, and better mood than the participants given the placebo pills.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Vitamin C is a safe and inexpensive supplement to give to your kids. It’s great news that it can potentially boost energy levels, attention, and mood. Taking this supplement is a no-brainer.

Original article:
Sim M, Hong S, Jung S, Kim JS, Goo YT, Chun WY, Shin DM. Vitamin C supplementation promotes mental vitality in healthy young adults: results from a cross-sectional analysis and a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Eur J Nutr. 2021 Sep 2. doi: 10.1007/s00394-021-02656-3. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34476568.

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

Close
Theme icon

Podcast /

Content /

Nourish

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

Vitamin C is a safe and inexpensive supplement. It’s known for its immune-boosting properties. But what about its effect on energy levels, attention, and mood?

Join The Family Thrive community and download the mobile app, all for free!

JOIN TODAY

Key takeaways

1

This article reports two studies that examine the link between Vitamin C and brain health in young adults

2

Researchers found a significant link between vitamin C supplementation and high levels of energy

3

They also found a link to stronger attention and better mood

Low hassle, high nutrition

Fierce Food: Easy

Fierce Food: Easy

50/50 mixes of powerful veggies and starchy favorites

Fierce Food: Balance

Fierce Food: Balance

Maximize nutrients, minimize sugar and starch

Fierce Food: Power

Fierce Food: Power

Ingredients

Kitchen Equipment

Ingredient Replacement

View replacement list (PDF)

Reading time:

3 minutes

What kind of study was this?

The article reports two studies the researchers did: an observational study was done at a single point in time (known as a cross-sectional study) and a randomized, placebo-controlled study where the researchers randomly assigned participants to two different groups, one given a placebo and the other given an active treatment. Then the researchers measured the differences between the two groups after a period of time.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know whether vitamin C levels and supplementation affect energy, mood, and cognitive functioning.

What did the researchers actually do?

In the first study, they took blood samples from participants and examined the link between vitamin C levels and mood. This is called a cross-sectional observational analysis and it can only tell us if two things are linked, not if one is causing the other (there could be a third unmeasured variable affecting both).

So, the researchers followed up with a randomized, placebo-controlled study that does a much better job at indicating whether one thing is causing another. In this second study, they randomly assigned participants to two groups: for four weeks, one group got a placebo pill twice a day and the other got a vitamin C pill twice a day (1000 mg per day).

At the beginning and end of the four weeks, the participants were given tests to measure energy levels, attention, and mood, among other things. At the end of the study, the researchers examined the differences in these measures between the groups.

What did the researchers find?

In the first study, they found a significant link between vitamin C levels in the blood and energy and mood. Then in the randomized, placebo-controlled study, they found that participants who were given vitamin C had significantly higher levels of energy, stronger attention, and better mood than the participants given the placebo pills.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Vitamin C is a safe and inexpensive supplement to give to your kids. It’s great news that it can potentially boost energy levels, attention, and mood. Taking this supplement is a no-brainer.

Original article:
Sim M, Hong S, Jung S, Kim JS, Goo YT, Chun WY, Shin DM. Vitamin C supplementation promotes mental vitality in healthy young adults: results from a cross-sectional analysis and a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Eur J Nutr. 2021 Sep 2. doi: 10.1007/s00394-021-02656-3. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34476568.

What kind of study was this?

The article reports two studies the researchers did: an observational study was done at a single point in time (known as a cross-sectional study) and a randomized, placebo-controlled study where the researchers randomly assigned participants to two different groups, one given a placebo and the other given an active treatment. Then the researchers measured the differences between the two groups after a period of time.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know whether vitamin C levels and supplementation affect energy, mood, and cognitive functioning.

What did the researchers actually do?

In the first study, they took blood samples from participants and examined the link between vitamin C levels and mood. This is called a cross-sectional observational analysis and it can only tell us if two things are linked, not if one is causing the other (there could be a third unmeasured variable affecting both).

So, the researchers followed up with a randomized, placebo-controlled study that does a much better job at indicating whether one thing is causing another. In this second study, they randomly assigned participants to two groups: for four weeks, one group got a placebo pill twice a day and the other got a vitamin C pill twice a day (1000 mg per day).

At the beginning and end of the four weeks, the participants were given tests to measure energy levels, attention, and mood, among other things. At the end of the study, the researchers examined the differences in these measures between the groups.

What did the researchers find?

In the first study, they found a significant link between vitamin C levels in the blood and energy and mood. Then in the randomized, placebo-controlled study, they found that participants who were given vitamin C had significantly higher levels of energy, stronger attention, and better mood than the participants given the placebo pills.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Vitamin C is a safe and inexpensive supplement to give to your kids. It’s great news that it can potentially boost energy levels, attention, and mood. Taking this supplement is a no-brainer.

Original article:
Sim M, Hong S, Jung S, Kim JS, Goo YT, Chun WY, Shin DM. Vitamin C supplementation promotes mental vitality in healthy young adults: results from a cross-sectional analysis and a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Eur J Nutr. 2021 Sep 2. doi: 10.1007/s00394-021-02656-3. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34476568.

What kind of study was this?

The article reports two studies the researchers did: an observational study was done at a single point in time (known as a cross-sectional study) and a randomized, placebo-controlled study where the researchers randomly assigned participants to two different groups, one given a placebo and the other given an active treatment. Then the researchers measured the differences between the two groups after a period of time.

What did researchers want to know?

They wanted to know whether vitamin C levels and supplementation affect energy, mood, and cognitive functioning.

What did the researchers actually do?

In the first study, they took blood samples from participants and examined the link between vitamin C levels and mood. This is called a cross-sectional observational analysis and it can only tell us if two things are linked, not if one is causing the other (there could be a third unmeasured variable affecting both).

So, the researchers followed up with a randomized, placebo-controlled study that does a much better job at indicating whether one thing is causing another. In this second study, they randomly assigned participants to two groups: for four weeks, one group got a placebo pill twice a day and the other got a vitamin C pill twice a day (1000 mg per day).

At the beginning and end of the four weeks, the participants were given tests to measure energy levels, attention, and mood, among other things. At the end of the study, the researchers examined the differences in these measures between the groups.

What did the researchers find?

In the first study, they found a significant link between vitamin C levels in the blood and energy and mood. Then in the randomized, placebo-controlled study, they found that participants who were given vitamin C had significantly higher levels of energy, stronger attention, and better mood than the participants given the placebo pills.  

What does this mean for parents and kids?

Vitamin C is a safe and inexpensive supplement to give to your kids. It’s great news that it can potentially boost energy levels, attention, and mood. Taking this supplement is a no-brainer.

Original article:
Sim M, Hong S, Jung S, Kim JS, Goo YT, Chun WY, Shin DM. Vitamin C supplementation promotes mental vitality in healthy young adults: results from a cross-sectional analysis and a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Eur J Nutr. 2021 Sep 2. doi: 10.1007/s00394-021-02656-3. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34476568.

Enjoying this? Subscribe to The Family Thrive for more healthy recipes, video classes, and more.

Discover Nourish

See more
New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

Podcast

Condimentum eu tortor bibendum.

By

Jackie Kovic

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

Podcast

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

By

Alexandra Tataryn

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

Podcast

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

Podcast

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

Podcast

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

Podcast

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

Podcast

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

Podcast

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

Pro Perspective

How to Decode Your Child’s Needs Through Observing Their Movement Patterns

By

Alexandra Tataryn

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

Podcasts

Podcast Ep. 28: Big News Plus a Guided Meditation Just in Time for the Holidays

By

The Family Thrive Podcast

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

New Research Tuesday

New Research Tuesday: Plastic chemicals found in 80% of fast food samples

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

New Research Tuesday

New Research Tuesday: Parenting Might Have Little to No Effect on Kids' Personalities

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

New Research Tuesday

New Research Tuesday: Vitamin C supplementation boosts brain health in young adults

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

Recipes

Crockpot Turkey Breast With Grain-Free Gravy

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

Recipes

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

Recipes

No-Bake Pumpkin Cheesecake

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

Recipes

Pumpkin Protein Smoothie

By

Chef Andrew Johnson

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

Give This a Try

Give This a Try: Get Sunlight Into Your Eyes in the Morning

By

The Family Thrive Expert Team

Subscribe to get all the goods

Join for free
Login