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New Research: Peanuts Are Better for Us Than White Rice


What kind of study was this?

A randomized controlled trial, meaning that researchers randomly assigned participants to different groups and measured the differences in outcomes between these groups.

What did the researchers want to know?

They wanted to find out if peanuts were a healthier snack than white rice for people with metabolic health problems if you kept the calories of the snacks exactly the same.

What did the researchers actually do?

They signed up only adults with metabolic health problems (overweight, diabetes, prediabetes, etc.) and they were randomly assigned to two different groups: one group got peanuts as a daily snack and the other group got white rice bars.

What did the researchers find?

The group that got peanuts had better metabolic health at the end of the study than the white rice group.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

First, not all calories are the same. One hundred calories of peanuts led to better metabolic health than 100 calories of white rice.

Second, not all whole foods are the same. Both peanuts and white rice are whole foods, but white rice is mostly starch, which raises blood sugar and insulin. Peanuts contain starch but much less than white rice, but most importantly peanuts contain protein and fiber, important nutrients that nourish the body in multiple ways.

Follow the New Research Tuesday topic to get notifications and stay updated on the latest research for family thriving!

New Research: Peanuts Are Better for Us Than White Rice

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New Research: Peanuts Are Better for Us Than White Rice

Researchers at the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition wanted to see if peanuts were a healthier snack than white rice for people with metabolic health problems

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Low hassle, high nutrition

Fierce Food: Easy

Fierce Food: Easy

50/50 mixes of powerful veggies and starchy favorites

Fierce Food: Balance

Fierce Food: Balance

Maximize nutrients, minimize sugar and starch

Fierce Food: Power

Fierce Food: Power

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Reading time:

3 Minutes


What kind of study was this?

A randomized controlled trial, meaning that researchers randomly assigned participants to different groups and measured the differences in outcomes between these groups.

What did the researchers want to know?

They wanted to find out if peanuts were a healthier snack than white rice for people with metabolic health problems if you kept the calories of the snacks exactly the same.

What did the researchers actually do?

They signed up only adults with metabolic health problems (overweight, diabetes, prediabetes, etc.) and they were randomly assigned to two different groups: one group got peanuts as a daily snack and the other group got white rice bars.

What did the researchers find?

The group that got peanuts had better metabolic health at the end of the study than the white rice group.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

First, not all calories are the same. One hundred calories of peanuts led to better metabolic health than 100 calories of white rice.

Second, not all whole foods are the same. Both peanuts and white rice are whole foods, but white rice is mostly starch, which raises blood sugar and insulin. Peanuts contain starch but much less than white rice, but most importantly peanuts contain protein and fiber, important nutrients that nourish the body in multiple ways.

Follow the New Research Tuesday topic to get notifications and stay updated on the latest research for family thriving!


What kind of study was this?

A randomized controlled trial, meaning that researchers randomly assigned participants to different groups and measured the differences in outcomes between these groups.

What did the researchers want to know?

They wanted to find out if peanuts were a healthier snack than white rice for people with metabolic health problems if you kept the calories of the snacks exactly the same.

What did the researchers actually do?

They signed up only adults with metabolic health problems (overweight, diabetes, prediabetes, etc.) and they were randomly assigned to two different groups: one group got peanuts as a daily snack and the other group got white rice bars.

What did the researchers find?

The group that got peanuts had better metabolic health at the end of the study than the white rice group.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

First, not all calories are the same. One hundred calories of peanuts led to better metabolic health than 100 calories of white rice.

Second, not all whole foods are the same. Both peanuts and white rice are whole foods, but white rice is mostly starch, which raises blood sugar and insulin. Peanuts contain starch but much less than white rice, but most importantly peanuts contain protein and fiber, important nutrients that nourish the body in multiple ways.

Follow the New Research Tuesday topic to get notifications and stay updated on the latest research for family thriving!


What kind of study was this?

A randomized controlled trial, meaning that researchers randomly assigned participants to different groups and measured the differences in outcomes between these groups.

What did the researchers want to know?

They wanted to find out if peanuts were a healthier snack than white rice for people with metabolic health problems if you kept the calories of the snacks exactly the same.

What did the researchers actually do?

They signed up only adults with metabolic health problems (overweight, diabetes, prediabetes, etc.) and they were randomly assigned to two different groups: one group got peanuts as a daily snack and the other group got white rice bars.

What did the researchers find?

The group that got peanuts had better metabolic health at the end of the study than the white rice group.

What does this mean for parents and kids?

First, not all calories are the same. One hundred calories of peanuts led to better metabolic health than 100 calories of white rice.

Second, not all whole foods are the same. Both peanuts and white rice are whole foods, but white rice is mostly starch, which raises blood sugar and insulin. Peanuts contain starch but much less than white rice, but most importantly peanuts contain protein and fiber, important nutrients that nourish the body in multiple ways.

Follow the New Research Tuesday topic to get notifications and stay updated on the latest research for family thriving!

Enjoying this? Subscribe to The Family Thrive for more healthy recipes, video classes, and more.

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